The Camellia, as presented by Tomoki Moriyama

Feb16 by Eguchiv translated to English by Priscilla Moore.
Nihon-ga artist and teacher Tomoki Moriyama from Okayama, Japan, has made a website with a very useful step by step approach to understanding the basics of floral painting and traditionnal Nihon-ga.

This has allowed me to offer you an abridged translation.

Please visit Tomoki Moriyama’s site to read the full lesson.

Step 1

Materials needed:
Boenogu colours or suihi, sumi, gofun and iwaenogu pigments.

Image hébergée par servimg.com

This sketch is done on paper, to finish with a clear line drawing.
The drawing is then transferred to an adapted support. (See Tomoki’s site)
The line drawing is then inked in.

Image hébergée par servimg.com

Once the drawing is inked in, we go on to the background: Yokaku, with ochre pigment and gofun.

Image hébergée par servimg.com

The colours used are carmine, ultramarine blue, green, gofun, indigo, gamboge (yellow); we will be looking to bring a cohesion to the whole picture.

Image hébergée par servimg.com

We will seek to gain balance in the values, and will thus avoid using too dark colours. The background colours can be found in the study.

Image hébergée par servimg.com

-Paint the background with two colours to achieve a gradation.
The general outline of the drawing is painted using basic colours
Apply a thin layer of gofun to integrate the underlying picture.

Image hébergée par servimg.com

Each petal is painted one by one, from the shaded area to the outside of the petal, in carmine ( Yoku 洋紅). Then by premoistening the petal with a wet paintbrush produce a gradation by pulling the tint from the interior of the petal towards the exterior. This technique is called katabokashi.
Image hébergée par servimg.com

Once all petals have been painted, mix some red with some orange (gamboge equivalent: dark yellow to orangey colour), and paint the centre of the flower with this colour. This transparent colour will leave the sumi-e beneath it visible.
Image hébergée par servimg.com

-For the leaves, mix yellow and indigo to create green. I used small quantities in different small bowls to create various subtleties of this green mixture. This way the result will be less monotone.
The veins of the leaves are painted by using Horinuri technique. The green is painted between the veins, which remain thus apparent (negative). Tarashikomi technique is also employed: colour is applied to another layer of paint which is still moist.
-The branch is painted with a mix of red, yellow, indigo and sumi ink.

Image hébergée par servimg.com

– It is possible to either stop there, or continue to work on the shadows, by bringing the background colours in to the study. Lightly wash the study with water and subsequently repaint the areas which are too washed out. This is an important process that creates a balance between ‘tension and looseness’.

Image hébergée par servimg.com

Wet the entire picture, add a colour on the darker part then wash with water to thin and lighten this colour.

Image hébergée par servimg.com

Or, paint over with a colour of light density, and wash undesired results.

Image hébergée par servimg.com

Redefine the petals with katabokashi and gofun, from the exterior to the interior.
Pay attention to the superposition of the petals by starting with those at the back.
The extent to which the gofun is drawn out is important.
The previously painted area must be dry before commencing the next.
Once the petals are painted with gofun, you can reshape the petals with a very light rose colour.

Image hébergée par servimg.com
*Leaves:
Horinuri and Katabokashi techniques are employed.
Harmony and adjustment is achieved with blue and yellow.
Each leaf is painted in a more realistic style. Sumi ink can also be added; sumi gives depth to colours.
Branch: Painted by observing the entire picture.

Image hébergée par servimg.com

The following step in the next article: finalisation with mineral pigments.

Glossary:
Katabokashi: onesided shading/gradation
Horinuri: painting between the lines
Tarashikomi: wash effect by applying a layer of colour on one that is still wet
Gofun: white pigment from shells
Suihi enogu: earth based pigments
Iwa enogu: mineral pigments
Bo enogu: solid colours
Yokaku: background of the picture

Thank you for your understanding when there maybe be errors or imperfect translation.
Translation from French to English by Priscilla Moore, Japanese to French by Valérie Eguchi and Koyo Daire.
Copyright Tomoki Moriyama

En français ici

Advertisements

Playing in Edo, Moriyama Tomoki, Solo Exhibition // 森山知己個展 江戸にあそぶ 

Playing in Edo, a Solo Exhibition by Moriyama Tomoki


Art Garden, Okayama Prefecture, Japan
19 August – 4 September 2011
11:00 – 18:00 (Tuesday. Closed)
http://www5d.biglobe.ne.jp/~agarden/

In this solo exhibition, artist Moriyama reveals his latest dragon ink paintings and other works in an exploration of the Rimpa tradition.

How did Rimpa painters in Edo depict their subjects? Could Rimpa master, Ogata Korin, have painted his red and white plum blossoms and flowing streams a different way? Inspired by Research Professor Baba (Kibi International University), “When you actually try to draw something, what was once invisible starts to become apparent”, Moriyama embarked on attempts to discover and meet ‘the invisible’.

The result is a lovely play on subjects revealed on folding screens laid with silver leaf and painted with sea creatures, alongside intricate flowing streams and Moriyama’s magnificent dragon ink paintings.

アートガーデンで「江戸にあそぶ」と題して個展を開きます。
会期:平成23年8月19日(金)〜9月4日(日)
11時〜6時 定休日は毎週火曜日
場所:岡山市北区富町1−8−6
電話 086−254−5559
Art Garden Web http://www5d.biglobe.ne.jp/~agarden/

今回は水墨の龍や琳派の手法などを試して描いています。光琳の紅白梅図屏風、あの流水は、もしかしたらこうして描いたのではないか?吉備国際大学の馬場先生の研究にも刺激を受けました。「実際に試して描いてみる事で見えてくる事もある」、今回もドキドキする様な出会いがありました。

この他、銀箔背景に海の生き物を描いた屏風や、水墨表現による龍など発表予定です。ご高覧いただけましたら幸いです。

なお申し訳ない事に会期も長く会場に毎日というわけにも行きません。
もしおいでのおり、不肖モリヤマと技法・材料の話などご希望の方、また久々なので顔など見たいとの方がおられましたら事前にご連絡いただけましたらありがたいです。
可能なら予定調整など極力どうにかしたいとは思っていますが、、、、、。

流水の描画方法検証他、出品作紹介は以下リンクよりどうぞ。
江戸にあそぶ 個展の紹介他