Looking back at Hu Mingzhe’s Mote exhibition at the National Art Museum of China, Beijing, May 2011.

I was first introduced to Hu Mingzhe’s work through a young student of hers who first introduced me to traditional heavy rock color painting- aka Nihonga in Chicago in 2001. At that time, her work depicted the human figure (you can see these in the video as well). Hu Mingzhe’s newer works in the Mote exhibition, which opened in May 2011 at the National Art Museum of China, Beijing, focus on the relationship between human beings and the universe, feeling the greatness of nature and the insignificance of human beings. The word mote stems from Buddhism, which means that the constituent part of everything in the universe is made of tiny particles, and its immensity is beyond limitation, as is its smallness.

Hu Mingzhe is a professor at the Central Academy of Fine Arts (Beijing) and a former visiting scholar at Tama University and Tokyo University of Fine Arts, Japan.

Introductory Nihonga Class in USA fuses Eastern Methods with Western Abstraction

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NIHONGA: THEN and NOW  

4 Day Basic Nihonga Workshop with JUDITH KRUGER

OCTOBER 3-6, 2013
Wisdom House Retreat and Conference Center, Litchfield, CT (during the peak of New England’s Fall foliage)

This workshop is a unique, introductory Nihonga (traditional Japanese mineral pigment painting) class. We will make grounds and pigment from organic and inorganic matter like cured shells, precious minerals, exotic soils, pine soot, indigo and silica. Metallic leafing and layering techniques will be covered. Emphasis will be on the creation of contemporary, matter-driven abstract painting, rooted in ancient processes. The attributes of the surrounding environment will be integrated for meditation and inspiration. Western and Eastern aesthetics  will be cross-referenced for creative exploration.

Registration ends September 1, 2013
Email: judy@judithkruger.com for pricing and registration details

For more information and visuals visit:  www.judithkruger.com